Deal / Collectibles of the Day!! CABINET OF CURIOSITIES!


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Guillermo del Toro Cabinet of Curiosities: My Notebooks, Collections, and Other Obsessions

Cabinets of Wonder

Diableries: Stereoscopic Adventures in Hell

Diableries: Stereoscopic Adventures in Hell Hardcover – October 19, 2013
by Brian May (Author) , Denis Pellerin (Author) , Paula Fleming (Author)

A devilish 1860s sensation – finally unleashed on the 21st century! In France, around 1860, from the loins of a traditional national fascination with all things diabolical, was born a new sensation – a series of visionary dioramas depicting life in a strange parallel universe called ENFER – Hell – communicated to an eager audience by means of stereoscopic cards, to be viewed in the stereoscopes which had already become popular in the 1850s. This 3-D phenomenon, which fascinated a nation for 40 years, is now yours to share. This book, the fruit of half a lifetime’s study by three impassioned authors, brings every one of the published Diableries into the 21st century for the very first time. Some of them are so rare that at the time of writing there is no known complete collection of the originals of these masterpieces. But this book enables all but two of the 182 scenes to be enjoyed just as their creators intended, in magnificent 3-D, using the high-quality patent OWL stereoscopic viewer supplied.

Product Details
Hardcover: 280 pages
Publisher: London Stereoscopic Company, The; Hardcover slipcased with 3D viewer edition (October 19, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0957424604
ISBN-13: 978-0957424609
Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 9.7 x 1.6 inches
Shipping Weight: 5.3 pounds


I read the above description, and being a huge stereoscopic fan had to get this book. If you feel the same way, go here: Diableries: Stereoscopic Adventures in Hell

FAVORITE THEATRICAL FILMS OF 2013

FAVORITE THEATRICAL FILMS OF 2013

These aren’t necessarily the best, not critical darlings like 12 YEARS A SLAVE or INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS (the Academy’s critical darlings, historically I am not a fan of) but they happen to be the ones I was interested enough to plunk down hard earned money to see in the theater. GRAVITY was my favorite and most enjoyable theatrical film of the year.

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Movie of the Day : THE GREAT ST. LOUIS BANK ROBBERY

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Starring Steve McQueen, (the famous actor not the famous director) in one of his earliest roles, THE GREAT ST. LOUIS BANK ROBBERY is a docu-pic/heist film, very much in the vein of other true crime films such as KANSAS CITY CONFIDENTIAL, that were all the rage in the late 50s. What differentiates this film from crime classics as KANSAS CITY CONFIDENTIAL is how ugly, and unkempt and unglamorous and unromanticized and in places mundane it is. It’s not a great film by any means, following as it does petty damaged lives in search of quixotic windmills, but this very seeming plodding approach, leads to moments of surprising and unexpected veracity and brutality.

It’s unsentimental nature, by the end becomes its strength, powering it, along with flashes of directorial style, to a memorable ending. So definitely worth a viewing. Grade: C+.

View it for free on your Roku device by signing up for Nowhere Archive here.

Podcast of the Day : THE DAILY SPILL

I’m listening to this podcast the Daily Spill right now, it is hilarious and informative. Listen now here!

These guys quicky jump on my list of this week’s FAVORITE PODCASTS:

THE DAILY SPILL
11′OCLOCK COMICS
B-MOVIE CAST
COMIC GEEK SPEAK
WTF
SIDEBAR
FATMAN ON BATMAN
HORROR ETC
WORD BALLOON
WNYC’s RADIOLAB

Director Spotlight : The Films of Kasi Lemmons

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With the perhaps unnecessarily color titled BLACK NATIVITY headed to theaters this November, I thought now was the perfect time to take a pictorial gander at the films of its director Kasi Lemmons; a director who unfortunately like too many directors, particularly directors of color, does not get a chance to work enough.

Her 1997 debut film EVE’S BAYOU remains a personal and perennial favorite, being equal parts coming of age story and southern gothic tinged horror and magical realism. In the nearly 20 years since that film’s debut she has managed to make 4 feature films and one short, which is good to have at least that much work from a unique and talented director, and is also a tragedy to only have had that much work from a talented and unique director.

I do think the economics of making a theatrically viable film in Hollywood has kept her from truly exploring the promise of her first film; as I would have loved to see a dozen movies from Kasi Lemmon’s in her unique and dangerous southern gothic magic realism vibe. In the directorial genes of Kasi Lemmons, you had the promise of a director with the unique output of a David Fincher or Nicolas Winding Refn.

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However the films we do get from her, even hampered by the constraints of producing more accessible and conventional movies, still are never completely… conventional. There are stylistic choices and decisions that in places, take your breath away. Particularly she has never shied away from strong Black protagonists, and Black male protagonists as heroes, leading men, rather than comedy relief or the sexless partner.

Kasi Lemmon’s cinematic viewpoint of Black Masculinity, even when that masculinity is dangerous or flawed, is never less than riveting and dignified and hopeful, and as such is a viewpoint that is virtually forbidden/extinct in Hollywood films. I doubt BLACK NATIVITY will be likewise blessed, but I will still support the film and go see it, in the hopes a respectable opening gets Lemmons back to making films, that transcend… convention.

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Eve’s Bayou

The Caveman’s Valentine

Talk to Me

Recommended On-Demand TV Show of the Day : CHOPPED

There is a lot to strongly dislike if not outright hate about the proliferation of reality television. Prominent among the bullet points are the devaluation of the role of writer, and the lowest common denominator nature of the ‘reality’ that is provided as entertainment.

However thankfully there are exceptions, and gems that rise against all probability from the mire. One of those gems, is the Food channel flagship show… CHOPPED.

It avoids the cartoony caricatures and idiocy of shows like IRON CHEF and just plays it straight, as a solid cooking competition, with worthy contenders and judges you can respect; and is just incredibly entertaining because of it.

At only half an hour it is the perfect length, and is completely addictive. It’s a great show for the girl or guy in your life to watch with you, especially if you are both fresh food and healthy food eaters, and constant cooks, like we are here in house Heroic Times. :) .

We have steamrolled through seasons of the show, thanks to Roku and Amazon Prime, and they just get better and better. In addition to being entertaining, CHOPPED is very informative to anyone who cooks or aspires to be a better cook. A great show!

This show appears to be on its 17th season, I say appears because how it designates a season seems to be a bit arbitrary and haphazard, but on the whole you get four seasons per year. Another failing is the show is not available on DVD or Blu-Ray. A failing because I think a DVD with special features, and extended episodes would be great. I would buy a nice DVD collection of a full year of shows. But till then we are stuck with on-demand and streaming.

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365 Days of Roku: Day 2 – Crackle’s GODZILLA

the earth remembers
the stones remember
If the earth and stones could only speak
they would tell us many things
—Native American Proverb

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Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack (2003) – This movie is generally considered the best Godzilla film (ignoring as it does every other Godzilla film except the first one) and by the 25th minute mark, when the central conceit of this film is revealed, I begin to believe that.

Never a Godzilla fan I’ve seen other Godzilla films and they generally do not transcend the campy concept of watching rubber suits attack each other, with no real story.

This movie however has a story, only gingerly touched on, of Godzilla as some interpretation of the vengeance of God, a punishment for the attrocities of the War in the Pacific; an engine of destruction powered by the restless dead. It is a movie that has an unexpected conscience, calling to memory Japan’s (in many way’s overlooked) attrocities during the pacific campaign.

From rape and concentration caps, to ethnic cleansing and wholesale genocide, the Godzilla of this film is the personification of all the wrath for those wrongs, married to the mindless, unthinking attrocities of the atomic bomb, of true holocaust.

Godzilla is very much Japan’s antagonist in this film, and the antagonist of all the industialized world, a howling tirade against all that creulty and science that went into his creation.

And if Godzilla is the film’s heavy, the trio of other monsters he squares off against in this film are the protectors of Japan, the souls of earth and air and glade and all that should endure in the flora and fauna and hope of Japan. However it’s hard to, while not condoning Godzilla’s destruction, not root for him against all adversaries, Man or Monster. Given Man’s history it is hard not to root for the King of Monsters and the spirit of vengeance, and see man as some particularly virulent termite deserving of the heel.

This dichotomy makes it a far more complex film then its cheesy and campy origins should allow, as this particular Godzilla film becomes a film about war by walking acts of god, and as such beyond the judgement of men; can at best only be endured and hopefully survived by men.

Or for those seeking to read less into their rubber monster movies, it is also just a good monster throw-down. Either way it grades a solid B+.